Intersections in Arizona and anywhere else in the U.S. are by far the riskiest spots for a cyclist to get an accident. According to an article on Nolo, bicycle accidents that involve a head-on collision with cars account for 11 percent, while those that happen on intersections are about 45 percent.  But why are intersections hazardous to a cyclist? 

  • Drivers underestimate the speed at which a cyclist is moving 
  • Not being on the lookout for oncoming cars and bicycles 
  • The size of the bike makes a cyclist less visible since they can easily blend with the surrounding 

When driving or riding around an intersection, it is vital for you as a motorist and the driver to exercise caution and avoid accidents. You should always dress in brightly colored reflective clothing that enhances your visibility. Also, ensure your bike has both front and rear lamps. You may as well learn how to execute emergency maneuvers to avoid accidents. 

When you are on the road, both you and the vehicle drivers should follow the rules of the road. But who takes liability during an accident at an intersection? It always falls to who has the right of way between you and the driver. According to the rules of the right of way, anyone that arrives first at an intersection that has no traffic signals has the right of way. If you arrive at the same time with a vehicle from a different side, the person on the right gets to move first. If the intersection is between a major road and a minor road, then whoever is on the major highway gets to move first. If an intersection is under the control of signals, and the signals do not detect your bike, you need to position the bike closer to the sensor or wait until the road is clear and cross. However, depending on the type of intersection, you may require to use different techniques to avoid any accidents.